How to Teach Your Kids to Love Reading

I have always loved reading. The pleasure of a good book is one of my favorite things in the world. Having gained so much from my penchant for books, I also want my children to have a passion for reading. In this age of internet, television, iPads and smartphones, getting children to love books is not as easy as it sounds. Yes, it’s not a walk in the park, but it can certainly be done.

Although it will require a great deal of our time and energy, helping our children learn to enjoy reading is one of the most important things we can do as parents. Children who love books are found to have a higher aptitude for learning, better communication skills, better coping capacities, and a healthier self-esteem.

There are many tips out there on how to instill the love for reading in our kids. One great post I can recommend for a bunch of wonderful pointers is this one: “Top 10 Tips to Help Children Love Reading.” But as for me, I think that the most effective way to encourage our children to love books is to constantly read to them–the earlier, the better.

How You Can Turn Your Kids into Bookworms

Every parent wants their child to be the kid who loves to read. However, I get the general feeling that a lot of parents that want this think that it is something a child is born with. A child isn’t born with a desire to read all the time, it is something that they grow interested in. How might a child grow interested in reading you ask? Well, typically parents who promote reading as a fun activity to their children tend to see results. If you plop your child down in front of the TV and let them watch it for hours on end, the chances they will turn it off in favor of a book are slim. If you actively read books to your children until they can learn to read on their own, you are setting them up for success. Take the initiative and make your child into a reader.

A post called, “Raising a Reader” featured on Monika’s World talked about this topic recently. The post lists ways that you can take an active approach to make reading a part of your family’s daily routine. It really isn’t that difficult to make these changes, and your child will reap the benefits of it.

Reading to Your Child From Miles Away: Be There Bedtime Stories

We recently posted about teaching your child to read here on My Catholic Blog and this post is also related to that topic. Teaching your child to read is truly important to their growth as a person. If you are a parent, grandparent, brother, or sister reading with a younger member of your family is not only a good chance for them to learn, but also a great opportunity to bond and spend time together. Cherish the time that you get to spend together and never turn down a request from a young child to be read a story.

Catholic Mom featured a post written by Jennifer Gladen recently about Be There Bedtime Stories. These books let you record yourself reading a story so that you can send it to a loved one. This is a great idea for parents who travel a lot, or grandparents who do not live close to their grandchildren. There is something special about hearing somebody’s voice that makes me feel like Be There Bedtime Stories would be a big hit with kids.

What do you think about Be There Bedtime Stories? Would you ever send one to a son, daughter, or grandchild?

Teaching Your Children to Read: What Methods Have You Used?

Parents teach their children to do a lot of things throughout life, some of them intentionally and other unintentionally. It is safe to say that young children are always watching, taking things in, and learning from life’s experiences. Teaching your child to read is a very big deal. Getting them even a small head start before they attend school can make a huge difference in their development and learning process. In my opinion, giving your child a head start can be as simple as reading them stories every night before bed. Instead of letting them watch TV getting into the habit of reading a book can be a really great thing. It not only teaches them words and sounds, but also reinforces a positive habit they will hopefully continue doing on their own some day.

A recent post on Playground Dad talked about teaching your baby to read. It goes over the methods of two individuals who teach very young children to read. I felt the methods discussed in the article were somewhat interesting, and would be curious to see them in action.

How did you teach your children to read and at what age?

Teaching Children to Read: Different Methods to Try

Teaching a child to read is not something that comes naturally to all parents. It takes a lot of hard work and patience to succeed in teaching a young child to read anything. Many parents use methods such as flashcards with letter or sounds on them to get started.

A post on Playground Dad by Ellie Perico gave some insightful tips on how to get your child reading. The post titled, “Teach Your Toddler to Read” is full of information about the best ways to get your toddler reading.

How have you succeeded in getting your children to read? What was your most successful method?